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Welcome to The Museum of Appalachia

Welcome to The Museum of Appalachia

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WELCOME!

The Museum of Appalachia is a living history museum — a pioneer mountain farm-village that lends voice to the people of Southern Appalachia through the artifacts and stories they left behind. Founded in 1969 by John Rice Irwin, the Museum is now a non-profit organization, and a Smithsonian Affiliate museum.

We offer self-guided tours, and are open every day of the week.

Roam our 65 picturesque acres and experience a recreated Appalachian community complete with: 35 log cabins, barns, farm animals, churches, schools, gardens.

Over 250,000 artifacts in 3 buildings, with vast collections of folk art, musical instruments, baskets, quilts, Native American artifacts, and more.

The Museum contains a Restaurant, a two-story Gift Shop, and hosts many special events throughout the year.

Founded by John Rice Irwin in 1969, the Museum is now a non-profit organization, and a Smithsonian Affiliate museum. Visit our “About Us” tab, or see below for more info.

PREVIEW OUR EXHIBITS

The Museum of Appalachia is an experience in living history.  This authentic mountain village and farm lends voice to the colorful and interesting stories of the mountain folk of Southern Pioneer Appalachia using their own words and the artifacts they left behind; it is home to one of the most all-encompassing collection of Appalachian artifacts on display anywhere.

“A discovery of a way of life.”

New York TImes

“The most authentic and complete replica of pioneer Appalachian life in the world.”

Tennessee Blue Book

MUSEUM NEWS & EVENTS

2018 Barn Dance

Barn Dance Fundraiser A special fundraising event to support the Museum of Appalachia The Museum of Appalachia, a Smithsonian Affiliate, will host its sixth annual Barn Dance [...]

A Candlelight Christmas

November 30 through December 2, 2018 | Popcorn balls and paper chains… fruits and nuts in their stockings … carols by the fire... a cedar tree cut in the nearby woods- that’s the Christmas most rural Appalachian children knew. And it's the Christmas we recreate each year...

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